WHO IS MOST LIKELY TO SELF-HARM?

Who is most likely to self-harm?

According to research, the majority are young women, although the percentage of young men seems to be on the increase. Self-harming behaviour is also significant among minority groups discriminated against by society. Someone who has mental health problems is more likely to self-harm. So are those who are dependent on drugs or alcohol, or who are faced with a number of major life problems, such as being homeless, a single parent, in financial difficulty or otherwise living in stressful circumstances. A common factor is often a feeling of helplessness or powerlessness with regard to their emotions.

Self-harm involves all of us on some level. We may all punish, distract or numb ourselves as a way of dealing with difficult feelings or situations

http://www.mind.org.uk/-source

WHY DO PEOPLE HARM THEMSELVES?

 

Why do people harm themselves?

A person who self-harms is likely to have gone through very difficult, painful experiences as a child or young adult. At the time, they probably had no one they could confide in, so didn’t receive the support and the emotional outlet they needed to deal with it. The experience might have involved physical violence, emotional abuse, or sexual abuse. They might have been neglected, separated from someone they loved, been bullied, harassed, assaulted, isolated, put under intolerable pressure, made homeless, sent into care, into hospital or to other institutions.

http://www.mind.org.uk/-source

WHAT IS SELF-HARM?

What is self-harm?

Self-harm is a way of expressing very deep distress. Often, people don’t know why they self-harm. It’s a means of communicating what can’t be put into words or even into thoughts and has been described as an inner scream. Afterwards, people feel better able to cope with life again, for a while.

Self-harm is a broad term. People may injure or poison themselves by scratching, cutting or burning their skin, by hitting themselves against objects, taking a drug overdose, or swallowing or putting other things inside themselves. It may also take less obvious forms, including unnecessary risks, staying in an abusive relationship, developing an eating problem (such as anorexia or bulimia), being addicted to alcohol or drugs, or someone simply not looking after their own emotional or physical needs.

These responses may help someone to cope with feelings that threaten to overwhelm them; painful emotions, such as rage, sadness, emptiness, grief, self-hatred, fear, loneliness and guilt. These can be released through the body, where they can be seen and dealt with. Self-harm may serve a number of purposes at the same time. It may be a way of getting the pain out, of being distracted from it, of communicating feelings to somebody else, and of finding comfort. It can also be a means of self-punishment or an attempt to gain some control over life. Because they may feel ashamed, afraid, or worried about other people’s reactions, people who self-harm often conceal what they are doing rather than draw attention to it.

It’s worth remembering that most people behave self-destructively at times, even if they don’t realise it. Perfectly ordinary behaviour, such as smoking, eating and drinking too much, or working long hours, day after day, can all be helping people to numb or distract themselves and avoid being alone with their thoughts and feelings.

http://www.mind.org.uk/-source

DISPLACEMENT-Distractions that can help…

1. Drawing on yourself in red marker
2. Snapping an elastic band on your wrist
3. Putting on fake or henna tattoos and
then peeling them off
4. Putting plasters or bandages on where
you want to self-harm
5. Mix warm water and food colouring
and put it on your skin
6. Make ice cubes with added red food
colouring and rub them on where you
want to self-harm
7. Squeezing ice cubes
8. Chewing leather
9. Use stage makeup to create fake injuries
1. Thinking about not wanting scars in the summer
2. Thinking about not wanting to go into hospital
3. Set yourself a target e.g. 10 minutes and promise yourself not to harm in this time, once you get
to the 10 minute point, set a new target of 15 minutes and continue
4. Use a glowstick, when you feel the urge to harm, snap the glowstick to start it glowing tell
yourself that you can’t harm until It stops glowing. The glow will last for a few hours by which
time your urges will hopefully have passed
10. Use skin coloured plasticine, smear it on your
skin, cut into the plasticine (carefully) pour
fake blood or food colouring into the fake cut.
11. Draw yourself or around your arm on a piece
of paper, draw the harm you are imagining
then destroy the picture
12. Take a photo of yourself when you are feeling
upset, write all over it how you are feeling
then destroy the picture.
13. Take a hot shower and use a good exfoliating
body wash and a sponge or glove and scrub!
14. Draw over all your old scars, which will
provide a repetitive action and hopefully will
relieve urges.
15. Bite into a chilli

source nshn

Understanding addiction

Understanding addiction-source bbc-health

Cocaine

 
 
 

Types of addiction

Crushed cigarette

People can be addicted to many different substances, from alcohol and illegal drugs to prescription medicines, as well as to some types of behaviour.

  • Alcohol – where do you cross the line from social drinking to addiction?
  • Amphetamines – some of the most commonly used illegal drugs, these synthetic drugs used as stimulants
  • Cannabis – there’s evidence it can help with some conditions, but also cause psychotic illness
  • Cocaine – renowned for being one of the most dangerous drugs
  • Ecstasy – immediate or short-term effects include an increased heart rate and raised blood pressure
  • Gambling – as many as 350,000 people in the UK have a significant gambling problem
  • Heroin – renowned for being one of the most dangerous drugs
  • LSD – one of the most powerful hallucinogens known
  • Legal highs – what are they?
  • Mephedrone and naphyrone – stimulants with effects similar to amphetamines, ecstasy or cocaine
  • Methadone – a mimic of heroin used to combat addiction
  • Nicotine – one of the most powerfully addictive drugs
  • Painkillers – sometimes known as a silent addiction
  • Prozac – over 35 million people worldwide have been prescribed this antidepressant
  • Sex addiction – six per cent or more of the population experience sex addiction
  • Tranquilisers – may be used to relieve anxiety or induce sleep

Prostate cancer symptoms-please check

Prostate cancer symptoms

Often prostate cancer doesn’t have any symptoms, but when they do occur they may include:

  • Urinating frequently
  • Difficult or painful urination or ejaculation
  • Delay or hesitancy before urinating
  • A feeling that the bladder has not completely emptied
  • Blood in urine or semen
  • Disturbed sleep because of the need to urinate

Sometimes the first sign of prostate cancer is from secondary deposits (also known as metastases) once the cancer has spread through the body. Prostate cancer typically spreads to the bones, so in advanced prostate cancer, the following symptoms may occur:

  • Weight loss
  • Bone pain
  • Pain in the loins, pelvis or lower back

It’s important to be aware that there are a number of non-cancerous medical conditions that may also cause these symptoms, for example infection or benign prostate enlargement. Diagnostic tests will help clarify the problem

Often prostate cancer doesn’t have any symptoms, but when they do occur they may include:

  • Urinating frequently
  • Difficult or painful urination or ejaculation
  • Delay or hesitancy before urinating
  • A feeling that the bladder has not completely emptied
  • Blood in urine or semen
  • Disturbed sleep because of the need to urinate

Sometimes the first sign of prostate cancer is from secondary deposits (also known as metastases) once the cancer has spread through the body. Prostate cancer typically spreads to the bones, so in advanced prostate cancer, the following symptoms may occur:

  • Weight loss
  • Bone pain
  • Pain in the loins, pelvis or lower back

It’s important to be aware that there are a number of non-cancerous medical conditions that may also cause these symptoms, for example infection or benign prostate enlargement. Diagnostic tests will help clarify the problem

Health-bbc=source

#Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline Personality Disorder is one of ten personality disorders recognised by the DSM IV.

A personality disorder is a type of mental illness and to be diagnosed particular criteria must be met. With personality disorders, the symptoms have usually been present for a long time. These symptoms have an overall negative affect on the sufferer’s life.

One of the core signs and symptoms in BPD is the proneness to impulsive behaviour. This impulsiveness can manifest itself in negative ways. For example, self-harm is common among individuals with BPD and in many instances, this is an impulsive act. Sufferers of BPD can also be prone to angry outbursts and possibly criminal offences (mainly in male sufferers) as a result of impulsive urges.

Another common feature of BPD is affective lability. This means that sufferers have trouble stabilising moods and as a result, mood changes can become erratic. Other characteristics of this condition include reality distortion, tendency to see things in ‘black and white’ terms, excessive behaviour such as gambling or sexual promiscuity, and proneness to depression.
(To learn more about symptoms and diagnostic criteria please go to the section on diagnostic criteria.)

These traits can sometimes make it very difficult for a person to maintain a relationship with someone with BPD as their behaviour and actions can be difficult to tolerate and hard to understand. It is important for persons close to a BPD sufferer to educate themselves on the condition so they can empathise with what the sufferer is going through and how they are feeling.

BPD is not usually diagnosed before adolescence. It has been suggested that BPD symptoms can sometimes improve as time goes on or even disappear all together. This is not always the case however as BPD can continue to affect sufferers well into later life.

Traits from other mental illnesses and psychological conditions from the DSM IV can often co-exist in BPD patients. These are usually anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression).

Is Borderline Personality Disorder a mental illness?

Yes! A mental illness is an illness that affects a person’s behaviour primarily rather than their physical well-being. BPD is considered by medical practitioners to be a severe psychiatric disorder. It is recognised as such by the DSM IV.

Mental illness is often not taken as seriously as physiological illness even though it is very common and can be very debilitating. It is often viewed as moodiness, craziness or a weakness when it is in fact a genuine illness that can be caused by physiological factors. People have as much control over developing a mental illness as they do over catching a cold. Like physical illness, mental illness needs treatment and is not something that someone can just will to go away.

Why the name Borderline?

The name borderline was coined by Adolph Stern in 1938. This name was used to describe patients who were on a ‘borderline’ between neurosis and psychosis. However, the symptoms of BPD are not so simplistic as to be defined in terms of neurotic and psychotic. The diagnosis of BPD is based upon signs of emotional instability, feelings of depression and emptiness, identity and behavioural issues rather than signs of neurosis and psychosis. However, the name Borderline has remained even though the definition has changed. Throughout Europe, the same disorder has been given the more appropriate and less misleading title of ‘Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder.’