Violent offenses.-= Borderline personality

Violent offenses. Borderline personality is associated with longstanding impulsivity and affective instability, including rage reactions. Therefore, one would suspect that more impulsive and violent offenders might be diagnosed with this disorder. Data seem to support these impressions.

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Destroy user interface control16,

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Destroy user interface control17 For example, Logan and Blackburn

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Destroy user interface control18 examined 95 women who had been incarcerated for violent offenses. Compared with women who had perpetrated minor violence, those with incarcerations related to major violence were four times more likely to be diagnosed with BPD. In keeping with these findings, Hernandez-Avila et al

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Destroy user interface control19 examined 370 alcohol/substance-dependent patients for criminal behavior and found that the diagnosis of BPD was associated with a greater number of pretreatment violent crimes.

 

While few studies have systematically examined the prevalence of BPD in those who commit homicide, Yarvis

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Destroy user interface control20 reported that BPD was one of the more common psychiatric diagnoses in a series of 100 murderers. In a British study of 90 men who were incarcerated for the murder of their female partner, Dixon et al

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Destroy user interface control21 found that 49 percent had borderline personality characteristics. In a German study, Hill et al

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Destroy user interface control22 examined individuals convicted of one-time sexual homicides and found that BPD was well represented. In contrast to these studies, in a French study, Pera and Dailliet

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Destroy user interface control23 found that only eight percent of 99 murderers suffered from BPD.

 

A number of authors have speculated about associations between variations of BPD (i.e., subtypes) and murderous acts. For example, Ansevics and Doweiko

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Destroy user interface control24 present the perspective that serial murderers represent a subtype of BPD, highlighted by manipulativeness. Cartwright argues that rage-based murders are related to a particular subtype of BPD characterized by elements of over-control.

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Destroy user interface control25 Finally, Papazian

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Destroy user interface control26 discusses the role of BPD in the serial killer. In summary, while not definitive at this juncture, the majority of current data and impressions indicate an association between BPD and the impulsive, rage-fueled murder.

 

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