Cyber Bullying Statistics

Cyber Bullying Statistics

Cyber bullying statistics refers to Internet bullying. Cyber bullying is a form of teen violence that can do lasting harm to young people. Bullying statistics show that cyber bullying is a serious problem among teens. By being more aware of cyber bullying, teens and adults can help to fight it.

 

 

Cyber bullying affects many adolescents and teens on a daily basis. Cyber bullying involves using technology, like cell phones and the Internet, to bully or harass another person.Cyber bullying can take many forms:

  • Sending mean messages or threats to a person’s email account or cell phone
  • Spreading rumors online or through texts
  • Posting hurtful or threatening messages on social networking sites or web pages
  • Stealing a person’s account information to break into their account and send damaging messages
  • Pretending to be someone else online to hurt another person
  • Taking unflattering pictures of a person and spreading them through cell phones or the Internet
  • Sexting, or circulating sexually suggestive pictures or messages about a person

Cyber bullying can be very damaging to adolescents and teens. It can lead to anxiety, depression, and even suicide. Also, once things are circulated on the Internet, they may never disappear, resurfacing at later times to renew the pain of cyber bullying.

Many cyber bullies think that bullying others online is funny. Cyber bullies may not realize the consequences for themselves of cyberbullying. The things teens post online now may reflect badly on them later when they apply for college or a job. Cyber bullies can lose their cell phone or online accounts for cyber bullying. Also, cyber bullies and their parents may face legal charges for cyber bullying, and if the cyber bullying was sexual in nature or involved sexting, the results can include being registered as a sex offender. Teens may think that if they use a fake name they won’t get caught, but there are many ways to track some one who is cyber bullying.

Despite the potential damage of cyber bullying, it is alarmingly common among adolescents and teens. According to Cyber bullying statistics from the i-SAFE foundation:

  • Over half of adolescents and teens have been bullied online, and about the same number have engaged in cyber bullying.
  • More than 1 in 3 young people have experienced cyberthreats online.
  • Over 25 percent of adolescents and teens have been bullied repeatedly through their cell phones or the Internet.
  • Well over half of young people do not tell their parents when cyber bullying occurs.

The Harford County Examiner reported similarly concerning cyber bullying statistics:

  • Around half of teens have been the victims of cyber bullying
  • Only 1 in 10 teens tells a parent if they have been a cyber bully victim
  • Fewer than 1 in 5 cyber bullying incidents are reported to law enforcement
  • 1 in 10 adolescents or teens have had embarrassing or damaging pictures taken of themselves without their permission, often using cell phone cameras
  • About 1 in 5 teens have posted or sent sexually suggestive or nude pictures of themselves to others
  • Girls are somewhat more likely than boys to be involved in cyber bullying

The Cyberbullying Research Center also did a series of surveys that found these cyber bullying statistics:

  • Over 80 percent of teens use a cell phone regularly, making it the most popular form of technology and a common medium for cyber bullying
  • About half of young people have experienced some form of cyber bullying, and 10 to 20 percent experience it regularly
  • Mean, hurtful comments and spreading rumors are the most common type of cyber bullying
  • Girls are at least as likely as boys to be cyber bullies or their victims
  • Boys are more likely to be threatened by cyber bullies than girls
  • Cyber bullying affects all races
  • Cyber bullying victims are more likely to have low self esteem and to consider suicide

Parents and teens can do some things that help reduce the cyber bullying statistics:

  • Talks to teens about cyber bullying, explaining that it is wrong and can have serious consequences. Make a rule that teens may not send mean or damaging messages, even if someone else started it, or suggestive pictures or messages or they will lose their cell phone and computer privileges for a time.
  • Encourage teens to tell an adult if cyber bullying is occurring. Tell them if they are the victims they will not be punished, and reassure them that being bullied is not their fault.
  • Teens should keep cyber bullying messages as proof that the cyber bullying is occurring. The teens’ parents may want to talk to the parents of the cyber bully, to the bully’s Internet or cell phone provider, and/or to the police about the messages, especially if they are threatening or sexual in nature.
  • Try blocking the person sending the messages. It may be necessary to get a new phone number or email address and to be more cautious about giving out the new number or address.
  • Teens should never tell their password to anyone except a parent, and should not write it down in a place where it could be found by others.
  • Teens should not share anything through text or instant messaging on their cell phone or the Internet that they would not want to be made public – remind teens that the person they are talking to in messages or online may not be who they think they are, and that things posted electronically may not be secure.
  • Encourage teens never to share personal information online or to meet someone they only know online.
  • Keep the computer in a shared space like the family room, and do not allow teens to have Internet access in their own rooms.
  • Encourage teens to have times when they turn off the technology, such as at family meals or after a certain time at night.
  • Parents may want to wait until high school to allow their teens to have their own email and cell phone accounts, and even then parents should still have access to the accounts.

If teens have been the victims or perpetuators of cyber bullying they may need to talk to a counselor or therapist to overcome depression or other harmful effects of cyber bullying.

Sources:

Richard Webster, Harford County Examiner, “From cyber bullying to sexting: What on your kids’ cell?” [online]

i-SAFE Inc., “Cyber Bullying: Statistics and Tips” [online]

Cyberbullying Research Center, “Summary of our cyberbullying research from 2004-2010” [online]

National Crime Prevention Council, “Cyberbullying” [online]

Related Article: Prevent Bullying >>

 

contact non compliance

Enter address Click to enter office address
Click to enter date
Cafcass Letter to the Court Contact Order monitoring compliance or non-compliance

Court:      
Court Case Number:      
Child/ren subject of the contact order

Name Gender Date of birth Age
                       
Adult parties to the proceedings

Name Gender Relationship to child/ren Date of birth
                       
                       

At the court hearing on       contact was ordered. A copy of the Order is attached. The Court imposed a contact monitoring requirement.

This letter is to notify the court of the following information:
     
insert brief report of what has happened, based on:
     
Cafcass contacts with parties and child/ren
Level of compliance with the contact order
Any further relevant information about the welfare of the child or risk assessment (only include if necessary)

The Court is asked to consider this information. The direction of the Court is requested about Cafcass’ future involvement.
Either
A copy of this letter has been sent to both adult parties named above
Or
A copy of this letter has not been sent to the adult parties named above. The court is asked to consider disclosure to both parties
Letter completed and signed by
Click to enter Practitioner’s name
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1 Nature of the activity being considered (insert one of the following)
·1 Information / assessment meetings about mediation
·2 Parenting information programmes
·3 Domestic violence prevention programmes
Provide information about name of provider; availability of vacancies; when the programme will start; and confirm (in all cases) that the provider is approved by either the Legal Services Commission (in the case of mediation information) or the DCSF (in the case of parenting information and DV prevention programmes).
2 Local availability
     
3 Accessibility to the party/ies
     
4 Suitability of the party/ies
     
In all DV cases, insert ‘I attach the suitability assessment from the proposed provider for the Domestic Violence programme, which addresses this point’.
5 The likely effect – i.e. what is the potential benefit
     
In all DV cases, insert ‘I attach the suitability assessment from the proposed provider for the Domestic Violence programme, which addresses this point’
Either
A copy of this letter has been sent to both adult parties named above
Or
A copy of this letter has not been sent to the adult parties named above. The court is asked to consider disclosure to both parties / the relevant party (in the case of a DV suitability assessment).

Letter completed and signed by:
Click to enter Practitioner’s name
Click to enter role

msg and the cqc

Dear Mr Gargett,

Thank you for the email.

We aware of an incident that has taken place at The Priory Hospital, Middleton St George. These matters have been looked into by both the Police and the local safeguarding authority who are the lead for investigating allegations of abuse. If you have any individual concerns in this regard you should contact the Police or local authority who will better placed to respond.

It might be helpful to confirm that we undertook inspections at the service the following times:

1) Scheduled unannounced inspection November 2011 ( 2 x compliance actions)
2) Follow up unannounced in April 2012 (compliance actions met).
3) Scheduled unannounced inspection December 2012 (3 x compliance actions)
4) Responsive unannounced inspection January 2013 (Warning Notice)
5) Follow up unannounced inspection February 2013 (Warning Notice and 2 compliance actions met)

The Commission will continue to review information at this service and undertake appropriate inspection activity where required.

I hope you find this helpful.

Yours sincerely


MP

I think that I shall never see

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in Summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.
Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.
Joyce Kilmer –

a mad world-excerpt from chapter 11

over the years i had learned so much about mental health issues and in may 2009 they became so useful in regards to my step daughter.

she became aggressive and violent often using knives,bleach and any thing else she could get hold of to inflict hurt or worse.i fought for her fighting the youth offending office and then probation who adopted”the she is just a naughty girl who deserves to be in prison even though i became her target because i tried to calm her down and keep her out of prison i submitted an application in may 2009 stating with evidence that she had borderline personality disorder-the so called authorities dismissed this out of hand and the prison sentences got more regular and painful for me too because i knew she had an illness but no one would listen 11 pshychiatric reports and many meetings and deals made she eventually got diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and was sectioned to a mental health hospital in 2011 and now in 2013 the fight goes on and there are a number of vendettas against me which have been going on but now it seems that i am some peoples public enemy number one.

my stepdaughter is still in a mental health hospital but whatever the future may bring i will fight on to help/advise who and when i can

a mad world-excepts from chapter 7

after years of being a self centred not very nice person my eldest sister was diagnosed with Paranoid Schizophrenia which although i guess looking back her behaviour was odd.

it had a horrific effect on my mother and my family.

although i did care my lifestyle would not change but after about six months of my sisters and families turmoil and my sort of caring and visiting my sister often it somehow put my life in to some sort of perspective.

it took my sisters serious mental health issues and my families suffering to make me see i was in my current lifestyle letting them all down just like my father did to us all many years ago.without the violence towards my family i was just like my father and although i protected my own children i was not there for my brothers and sisters who had suffered at my fathers hands all them years ago.

so after some serious soul searching i got some help to reduce my alcoholic life style and transferred my energies into researching mental health conditions and over time i became more and more aware of Paranoid Schizophrenia and spent many hours discussing the way forward with my sisters doctors and being able to in a way translate things to my mother and family.

after years of ups and downs and my sister setting her flat on fire after discharge from the mental health hospital the medication began to work and in a way because of my research i was in a great position to help.listen to her and offer advice.

my childhood and my sisters illness made me stronger,probably saved my life and began my constant research into mental health and if my life was different then i would not have become who i am

a mad world-chapter 3 summary

so after the viloence from my father etc was over i went off the rails not just a little but right of the track

i took to drinking and fighting for no good reason,i would like to say i got into a bad crowd but i was the bad crowd.

an alcoholic violent father took away my childhood and here i was following in his alcoholic footsteps.i was never violent to females in fact i loved the ladies more than i should of and i did not care if they where single or not.

i started going to nightclubs working at times and taking jobs i would never should of but the pay days where good and paid for my lifestyle i swore has a kid i would not follow-the alcohol but i did and i was hooked on alcohol not that i would ever admit that back then so i drank to forget who i was and through alcohol became more of the person i was drinking to forget.

i was married,had two children and was a reasonably good father but the alcohol and my lifestyle did not change.

i always made sure there was always food in the house and the mortgage bills always paid

christmas and birthdays for my children where never like mine and my sisters and brothers where in fact totally the opposite.my children never saw violence in the house and there toys where never smashed up by a drunken father which happened often when i was a child.

it was like a double life a loving caring over protective father and then my other life of alcohol and violence.