MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS

MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS.

what is been aware of a mental illness/disorder mean.

if there was a sudden contrast in someones mood or they get aggressive and angry when normally they are not or if thier anger etc gets incresingly worse.

this does not mean there is a mental illness/disorder but i would start to watch more noticably over 24 to 36 hours but a dramatic change in temper and tolerance it possibly would be a good idea to note things down without them knowing.

there is no easy answers to monitoring mental illness/disorders but this is a very rough guide.

MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS

it is time to change our mental health system -it is not fair-it is not right-its under regulated,so why do we accept it.

ignorance-not caring-not affected by it-dont know how to change it

the CQC are the body to rgulate care but they do not care-so let them know how dissatisfied we all areImagemind,rethink and sane are three organisations i have the upmost respect for and i am a member of-come on people its time to change 

RETHINK ON BORDERLINE P.D

 

Borderline personality disorder

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) originally referred to the condition being on the borderline between psychosis and neurosis. It is a disorder in which a person has a pattern of unstable personal relationships and poor impulse control in areas such as spending, sexual conduct, driving, eating, and substance abuse. They may not have a strong sense of who they are. Additionally, the person suffering from BPD fears abandonment and will go to any length to prevent this, often feeling chronic emptiness.

There may be suicidal threats, gestures or attempts made by the person with BPD. There may also be self-harming behaviour. Their mood may change quickly, often with outbursts of anger. There may also be times when someone with BPD believes in things that aren’t real (delusions) or experiences things that aren’t really there (hallucinations).

BPD is a controversial diagnosis and some psychiatrists do not believe it exists.

bpd and the DSM IV

ImageWhatisBorderlinePersonalityDisorder?

Borderline Personality Disorder is one of ten personality disorders recognised by the DSM IV.

A personality disorder is a type of mental illness and to be diagnosed particular criteria must be met. With personality disorders, the symptoms have usually been present for a long time. These symptoms have an overall negative affect on the sufferer’s life.

One of the core signs and symptoms in BPD is the proneness to impulsive behaviour. This impulsiveness can manifest itself in negative ways. For example, self-harm is common among individuals with BPD and in many instances, this is an impulsive act. Sufferers of BPD can also be prone to angry outbursts and possibly criminal offences (mainly in male sufferers) as a result of impulsive urges.

Another common feature of BPD is affective lability. This means that sufferers have trouble stabilising moods and as a result, mood changes can become erratic. Other characteristics of this condition include reality distortion, tendency to see things in ‘black and white’ terms, excessive behaviour such as gambling or sexual promiscuity, and proneness to depression.
(To learn more about symptoms and diagnostic criteria please go to the section on diagnostic criteria.)

These traits can sometimes make it very difficult for a person to maintain a relationship with someone with BPD as their behaviour and actions can be difficult to tolerate and hard to understand. It is important for persons close to a BPD sufferer to educate themselves on the condition so they can empathise with what the sufferer is going through and how they are feeling.

BPD is not usually diagnosed before adolescence. It has been suggested that BPD symptoms can sometimes improve as time goes on or even disappear all together. This is not always the case however as BPD can continue to affect sufferers well into later life.

Traits from other mental illnesses and psychological conditions from the DSM IV can often co-exist in BPD patients. These are usually anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression).

Is Borderline Personality Disorder a mental illness?

Yes! A mental illness is an illness that affects a person’s behaviour primarily rather than their physical well-being. BPD is considered by medical practitioners to be a severe psychiatric disorder. It is recognised as such by the DSM IV.

Mental illness is often not taken as seriously as physiological illness even though it is very common and can be very debilitating. It is often viewed as moodiness, craziness or a weakness when it is in fact a genuine illness that can be caused by physiological factors. People have as much control over developing a mental illness as they do over catching a cold. Like physical illness, mental illness needs treatment and is not something that someone can just will to go away.

Why the name Borderline?

The name borderline was coined by Adolph Stern in 1938. This name was used to describe patients who were on a ‘borderline’ between neurosis and psychosis. However, the symptoms of BPD are not so simplistic as to be defined in terms of neurotic and psychotic. The diagnosis of BPD is based upon signs of emotional instability, feelings of depression and emptiness, identity and behavioural issues rather than signs of neurosis and psychosis. However, the name Borderline has remained even though the definition has changed. Throughout Europe, the same disorder has been given the more appropriate and less misleading title of ‘Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder.

yesteryear

  Mental Health
« Thread Started on Sept 8, 2009, 11:05pm »
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Is drug misuse now recognised as a mental health issue?
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Steve Mudd
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 Re: Mental Health
« Reply #1 on Sept 9, 2009, 12:34pm »
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Bob, in response to you question, it appears that drug misuse is now linked with mental health in so much as its recognised that behind the substance abuse often lies a mental health issue. There are now Dual Diagnosis teams situated in treatment centres around the country to address this issue which we consider a major move forward in treatment. Its so much more productive to treat these underlying issues rather than deal with their effects, i.e. long term Methadone programs or prison! What do you think?
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daniellesworld
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 Re: Mental Health
« Reply #2 on Sept 21, 2009, 10:34pm »
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it is now generally looked upon in the same way as alcoholism and like steve says it is in a lot of cases classed as mental health
mike
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sadie
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 Re: Mental Health
« Reply #3 on Jul 7, 2010, 3:14pm »
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I just wanted to write to other parents that My son had smoked skunk and taken a variety of prescription drugs for several years. he became quite paranoid and eventually I noticed very strange behaviour and at times aggression towards me, and other family members. Although he was only 16 years old I found it very difficult when I knew he needed help and that it was obvious that he was suffering from mental health issues to be told “unless he either contacts us or engages in our services their is nothing we or you can do”. Well I have heard the same story from many other parents over the last few years and it is heartbreaking to see how many mothers are left in despair. the only comfort I got was being able to take some time out and talk through my worries and I can only sat Thank God for that as I honestly think I would have ended up having a complete breakdown. Stick together Mum’s WE REALLY NEED EACH OTHER.
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daniellesworld
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 Re: Mental Health
« Reply #4 on Nov 7, 2010, 12:12pm »
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i am in total agreement that mental health issues are very complex and can be intimidating both for the carer,family and indeed the person themselves.i have gained over the previous 24 months a lot about mental health law and rights of individuals including family members.
i would be more than willing to to talk,listen and advise any person who have concerns on mental health issues.
if you would like to know more or just talk please contact steve on this site and he will give you my details.
mike